Service Dogs

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9Mike2

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The wife and raised both Husky and Malamutes, and right off the bat Husky do not do anything they don't want to do, they are independent thinkers. Yes they can be trained but it takes way more time than I have. They are a good family dog, read as pack dog. We still love them, and yes I tried to train one to retrieve, she would get it, the bird, but it became hers and would tenderize it till she got tired of it. Our Malamutes on the other hand were very protective of the kids and would help them if they hurt themselfs or come get us...
 

64Trvlr

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I've had a service dog for over 25 years now. I've always had a Lab because that's the breed I wanted. They open and close doors, turn lights on and off, pick things up including me once in a while, keep an eye on things, will pull my manual wheelchair, some other stuff and they always go everywhere with me.

They have always been welcome anywhere I've taken them.

As for your new dog there has been some good advice for you here. I'd add having your dog "snake proofed" since you spend time in the outdoors. Not only will it keep your dog safe it may well keep your son safe too.

Best of luck with the new pup.
 
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Laurits

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I've had a service dog for over 25 years now. I've always had a Lab because that's the breed I wanted. They open and close doors, turn lights on and off, pick things up including me once in a while, keep an eye on things, will pull my manual wheelchair, some other stuff and they always go everywhere with me.

They have always been welcome anywhere I've taken them.

As for your new dog there has been some good advice for you here. I'd add having your dog "snake proofed" since you spend time in the outdoors. Not only will it keep your dog safe it may well keep your son safe too.

Best of luck with the new pup.
How is a dog "snake proofed"?
 

64Trvlr

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How is a dog "snake proofed"?
The last 6 dogs I've had went to a guy that does it for a living. I'm in AZ so the snakes he uses are sidewinder, diamondbacks and mohave rattlesnakes. He has them in a controlled environment of an acre or so and walks your dog towards the snakes that are under stuff, in the open just like the places you go outdoors. The guy I use has a shock collar that he can zap the dog with if it goes for the snake. It doesn't take more than a couple of zaps and the dogs want no part of any snakes.
 
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The last 6 dogs I've had went to a guy that does it for a living. I'm in AZ so the snakes he uses are sidewinder, diamondbacks and mohave rattlesnakes. He has them in a controlled environment of an acre or so and walks your dog towards the snakes that are under stuff, in the open just like the places you go outdoors. The guy I use has a shock collar that he can zap the dog with if it goes for the snake. It doesn't take more than a couple of zaps and the dogs want no part of any snakes.
Got it. Thanks
 
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Jrodrigues1278

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The last 6 dogs I've had went to a guy that does it for a living. I'm in AZ so the snakes he uses are sidewinder, diamondbacks and mohave rattlesnakes. He has them in a controlled environment of an acre or so and walks your dog towards the snakes that are under stuff, in the open just like the places you go outdoors. The guy I use has a shock collar that he can zap the dog with if it goes for the snake. It doesn't take more than a couple of zaps and the dogs want no part of any snakes.
Never heard of snake proofing .... that is a great thought. Thanks I will look into it.
 
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9Mike2

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As my dogs were for hunting here in Low Cal , Snake-proofing is a must. A dog following a sent can walk right up on one in the blink of an eye, and could die. I for one would not handle the loss of my buddy like that. Even as a service dog that would be a most excellent idea to protect your fur buddy...
 

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I have a service dog and have had him for about 8 years now. I have had very few problems with him. Usually just with the unintentionally, uninformed people trying to do their job. Usually a quick conversation or just saying, "He is a service dog," is all it takes. I actually keep a small file folder behind the passenger seat that has his letter of certification, shot records, and copies of the law from the ADA website in it. I pass these off in a friendly way if someone seemed interested in learning more. I also carry his service animal ID card in my wallet. That being said, none of this is required by law.

Know your rights and the rights of the business, (because they probably don't.) I have often left information with an establishment that has had problems in the past with animals. From what I have heard personally most of the time the problems the establishment has had were with animals that were not actual service animals.

Usually, people just don't want to leave fido at home, though most comfort dogs and therapy dogs are usually pretty well behaved if they are the real deal. The people that have poorly trained animals and also pull the service dog card are the ones that cause our problems. It will be a bad past experience that puts businesses on edge when you walk in.

Service dogs are held to higher standards than comfort and therapy dogs, that is why they are allowed to go places others are not.

Fun fact: The only animals that can be service animals are dogs and miniature horses. I seriously thought about the horse but glad now I didn't. Trying to go on flights with a 100-pound black lab/great dane mix while the room between rows continually is getting smaller is bad enough.

My advice for what it is worth: Keep up the animal's training. It is not a pet, it is there to provide a service. Even as a working dog they will get better treatment than most peoples dogs will ever see in their lives.

Be aware: as the dog becomes accustomed to going places they form a very strong bond and can go through separation anxiety if you choose to do something without them, i.e. a quick run into 7-11 or something. Make this a part of their training if this is something you see happening.

Please feel free to ask any questions, send me a DM or on here. I am not on every day but am on here every three days or so. If you write I will write back.

Start with this:
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("Usually, people just don't want to leave fido at home, though most comfort dogs and therapy dogs are usually pretty well behaved if they are the real deal. The people that have poorly trained animals and also pull the service dog card are the ones that cause our problems. It will be a bad past experience that puts businesses on edge when you walk in.")

BINGO............Seen it in action, Had a plane trip going home, where the lady in the seat in front of me had a little fur-ball, that WAS NOT a service animal, but she claimed he was, and the airline allowed it. Probably because he was so small and unobtrusive. During the flight she let slip that the dog just traveled with her, when talking to her next seat passenger. There has been years of talk about curbing or limiting (clarifying) what qualify 's as a service animal. But nothing ever comes of it, and the program slowly morphs into something bigger and more inclusive, thus diminishing the original intent.

In the last quarter of 2019, the local VON"S grocery store posted signs at both entrances explaining the requirements and law for service animals. They must of had a bad experience with a poser, as I had never seen the notices ever displayed before. I had however seen very small breed dogs with ......service dog....., on their vests, but not acting like you see a TRUE- 'SERVICE DOG' in action.:frowning:
 

mpcEPTX

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Hi, Y'all. I don't own any service dogs but I'm a certified dog trainer, bite prevention educator, certified collaborative care professional and I'm getting certified in service dog training. If there's anything I can do to help you, please let me know. I'm from Texas but I have connections all over the country.
 
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RegistersandRoadwarriors

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I am looking at a trainer/breeder in which the training is pretty extensive. As the main handler, I will travel out there for a week before bringing the dog home. When the dog comes home, one of the trainers comes down to my home (stays locally) and trains the family on handling the dog.

I think it sounds appropriate but what do I know...?
If the dog will be an SD for your son, a trainer would want your son present for all training sessions. If the trainer is marking you as primary handler and wants the FAMILY to learn how to handle the dog, that's not a SD; that's a family obedience/protection dog (depending on level of training.)

Does the trainer have references from individuals who used them for their SD training?
 
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RegistersandRoadwarriors

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We have decided to get a german sheppard. They are awesome, and while not technically a service dog, we can train her to protect and help Colin in every way we want. Putting my deposit in at a breeder in Sask soon.
Caution: a trained family dog is not covered under ADA protection for service animals. A service animal must be trained to perform a specific task for the handler.

Not being mean here (sometimes I hate forums.) I have been a dog trainer for twenty years, and I currently have a personal Czech working line German Shepherd and getting a second one in the Spring.

I don't know how much experience you have with German Shepherds, but if you need an outsider's help, don't hesitate to reach out.

Just some things to consider for your pup:

* How are the parents registered (since you are buying from a breeder)?
* What have the parents and other dogs in the pedigree done?
* What are the parents' temperaments?
* What are the parents' nerves?
* Have the parents (at minimum) had their hips and elbows checked for dysplasia? Cardiac? Dilated myleopathy?
* What is their policy relating to HD/ED or other congenital health issues? Temperament issues?
* How long have they been breeding? Training?
* What, exact, training do they provide?
* What are their references for trained dogs?
* HOW do they train?

There are about a dozen additional questions that should be answered by the breeder when they do their screening of potential clients. We love German Shepherds ❤ They are some of the best dogs out there (we love all dogs.)

We expect pictures
 
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Glenlivet

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My SD, Glenlivet, is a four year old golden who helps me with occasional lingering effects of a head wound back in my Marine Corps days. He’s one of a handful of long distance sidecar dogs with 15,000 miles under his collar. This year we added a 4WD Xterra to the mix so we can reach the southwest while the temps are still tolerable but Vermont is still covered in ice and snow

Covid has been a real challenge as we’ve limited our outings and he’s been slipping a bit on his training. He would completely ignore people and stay focused on me, but isolation seems to be bringing out his social butterfly. He obeys verbal correction instantly, but I really need to get him out and back on his game

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El-Dracho

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My SD, Glenlivet, is a four year old golden who helps me with occasional lingering effects of a head wound back in my Marine Corps days. He’s one of a handful of long distance sidecar dogs with 15,000 miles under his collar. This year we added a 4WD Xterra to the mix so we can reach the southwest while the temps are still tolerable but Vermont is still covered in ice and snow

Covid has been a real challenge as we’ve limited our outings and he’s been slipping a bit on his training. He would completely ignore people and stay focused on me, but isolation seems to be bringing out his social butterfly. He obeys verbal correction instantly, but I really need to get him out and back on his game

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A long distance sidecar dog - that is cool! On the picture it looks like he is really enjoying it! And Glenlivet is a cool name for a dog of course :wink:
 

Rogerrover

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hello, im a disabled vet/. USAF. I have type 2 diabetes, and was dxd in Feb. 06 with MS, I suffer from PTSD , and have chronic depression and chronic Pain, yeah i am tfu to say the least.

that said. I had two service dogs they both passed this year after many years of a happy working life.
my first was a Queensland heeler, i got him for his natural ability at being calm and attentive to its worker humans. they are highly intelligent and need a job to do in their lives. He began life in a litter of 8 i got him at six weeks old. i trained him as a pup and he stayed within arms length of me for his first year of life other than potty times outside. and then he had a wonderful life and helped me with counter balance on walks. he stayed at my feet when i dozed off from narcolepsy and barked when people got to close. he would jump on me to say to me sit when my body would get stressed and tired. and was the most loving playful and loyal animal to the end of his life. he was fifteen years old his name was Jake

my other was a rottie rescue at three years of age and major abuse from another vet whose PTSD and drug use was out of control, She eventually after a year of my rescuing her from him she began to be a cuddly animal loyal to my needs as well. she helped with mobility as well but managed best with my depression and PTSD. even though abused physically she was helpful when it came tot the PTSD. one of the first things i taught her when she would sleep and have nightmares i would lay on her neck and after a while she would recognize my stress when i would lay down and she would do the same for me. she was 11 years old . when she passed her name was Eva.

I will soon be looking to get one more animal in my life i am 57 so will choose wisely in my search. all i can say to those who have a disability no matter what it is, read the ADA laws. and memorize them and keep copies of them as you start to interact with the public with your service animals. and businesses.
And recognize the difference between a service animal and a pet as well as the difference between a service animal and an Emotional support animal.

roger rover, over and outIMG_0130.JPG
 
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The Roach ...

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im a vet... had a Belgian Malinois... SD / retired MWD ... he was a 'cut -dog' from Lackland's program due to his mom.. got him at 9 months.. and we repurposed him as a SD. had him for 13 years. had to put him down june 2019 due to spondylitis... I want another Belgian... been looking. but hard to find. most say belgians cant be sd's but honestly... he was amazing.. got me through pts, stroke, cancer, two divorces... miss him hourly.
 

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Blackey

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I’m trying to get my 18 month old puppy trained locally but the trainer hads been out of town from the person that knows them tells me.

im a retired veteran from the usaf. I have type 2 diabetes, chronic pain, sleep apnea, depression, mild ptsdand fell like the dodge joke. How do fix a dodge? Take the radiator cap off and drive a Ford under it that’s how I feel take a hat off me and but a new body under it.