What do you use for camp light?

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Embark With Mark

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Two of the main reasons I do not use LED lights as much as possible is due to two things - they are too bright and they hurt my eyes.

Also, several studies have now come to light showing that LED lights are irreparably damaging the retina in eyes. They also disturb biological and sleep rhythms. The same goes for those in cellphones.
I would normally agree with you on this. That is the reason I do not run LED headlights. However, I was pleasantly surprised by the light output of the light I installed. Not only is it only 10watts. It can be dimmed down and the light color can be adjusted away from that harsh blue/white led light.
 

Jaytperry89

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We use several different brands of lanterns. Ranging from small to work lights essentially. All of them are led lights. The ones I use most are smaller though. I hang one under my tent on its d ring and it does a great job lighting up the annex. Most of my lights are cheap, and therefore easy to replace if it breaks or gets lost. Im not sure of the brands, all of them are Amazon specials though. I tend to not use the light outside of the tent and cooking area. I really enjoy the atmosphere of being in the middle of nowhere with the only light being my fire. Really brings out the stars
 
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Correus

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I would normally agree with you on this. That is the reason I do not run LED headlights. However, I was pleasantly surprised by the light output of the light I installed. Not only is it only 10watts. It can be dimmed down and the light color can be adjusted away from that harsh blue/white led light.
Still doesn't diminish the damage to the retina.
 

Tundracamper

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Two of the main reasons I do not use LED lights as much as possible is due to two things - they are too bright and they hurt my eyes.

Also, several studies have now come to light showing that LED lights are irreparably damaging the retina in eyes. They also disturb biological and sleep rhythms. The same goes for those in cellphones.
All the Goal Zero lights I considered are dimmable. That was a requirement.
 
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huachuca

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So question for you Coleman fans... why? Lighting is one of those things that has shown massive improvement in the past 10 years that I can't understand why anyone would want to carry something so unwieldy.
Get back to me when your ‘massively improved’ lights have been around for over sixty years. The Coleman lantern and stove I bought at a yard sale during my sixties college days are still performing well. Agree with all of GrumpyRam’s reasons: there’s a great memory behind every scratch and dent on these. And both will burn regular gasoline in a pinch.
 
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LostWoods

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Get back to me when your ‘massively improved’ lights have been around for over sixty years. The Coleman lantern and stove I bought at a yard sale during my sixties college days are still performing well. Agree with all of GrumpyRam’s reasons: there’s a great memory behind every scratch and dent on these. And both will burn regular gasoline in a pinch.
You're more than welcome to cherish memories and nostalgia but longevity doesn't define usefulness. There is no denying that LEDs are superior in nearly every way to anything 60 years ago. For me the excess weight and bulk isn't worth it when I have a full lighting kit that covers everything and is still smaller than my old Coleman without considering fuel.
 

bgenlvtex

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That's all related to the temperature of the lighting and there are options out there that give a warm glow with brightness control. As long as you stay on the lower side of 5000k then you'll be fine.
Warm white 3500-4500 Kelvin is pretty natural spectrum.
 

rumbledawg

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You're more than welcome to cherish memories and nostalgia but longevity doesn't define usefulness. There is no denying that LEDs are superior in nearly every way to anything 60 years ago. For me the excess weight and bulk isn't worth it when I have a full lighting kit that covers everything and is still smaller than my old Coleman without considering fuel.
ever since i was a kid we have used Coleman lanterns.
i like them cause i like them, familiarity, the light they throw and i have been using my current 286 for 34 yrs. haven't bought any other kind of lantern/led/light source since- money saved.
as small as a led- nope, but room for something that is the size of a case of pop has never been a worry for me, and this is my third season going on this can of fuel. space considerations- not on my radarIMG_3827.JPGIMG_3829.JPG

i just like old things, my coleman lantern, my trucks, my house, my wife.......
 

MOAK

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We used the old Coleman lantern for decades. I was stubborn. As much of a pita that it was to replace the socks after each days “overland” drive, I continued to perform the ritual every evening. It dawned on me one trip that we would easily go through 6 or 7 pairs of socks a trip. I started looking around for an alternative. We already had good headlamps. Now we have two really good rechargeable lamps. One for inside the tent that gets used often, and one for the awning, which very rarely gets used. We use our headlamps for everything else, and more often than not, the red light gets turned on. We prefer a dark camp with very minimal lighting. We’ve even disabled the interior lights of the Landcruiser when opening doors and replaced the courtesy curb lights with red ones. I’ve never understood anyone’s need to light camp up like a Christmas tree. It’s amazing what you can see in the dark. When a camp is lit up, you cannot see past the light, but someone can see you for miles. We prefer to see for miles. We remote camp to be a part of, not an invader of nature. BTW, I gave the old Coleman lantern to a nice young car camping couple, I’m pretty sure they are still using it, even after 7 years. Those lanterns were very reliable.
 

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Hi,

During the years I've tried so many different lamps over the years. Some time ago I checked again what was going on in the camping lantern market. My requirements were:
  • electrical with a USB rechargeable and exchangeable battery pack,
  • LED (because I'm a big LED fan)
  • dimmable (more versatile and beautiful light for cosiness in the camp) and
  • classic optics.
So a lot of requirements. But I found something. The Barebones LED table and hanging lamp. I am very satisfied with that! In the meantime I have also seen them here in the OB store: Beacon Lantern - Antique Bronze

By the way, a smiliar topic was discussed also in the Gas lantern or battery powered latern thread at the Camp QA section here at OB forum. You can find a lot of good recommedaion around this topic also there.

Cheers, Björn
 

xc70az

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Luci solar string lights, best lights we ever got. Turn any camping spot into a cozy place. Complement with headlamps. Charge by solar or USB.

Luci makes great stuff. We got the inflatable Luci Lux Solar Lantern at REI. Best $25 we ever spent.
 

MMc

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You can’t preheat your tent with LED. I would put the “old Coleman” in the tent and a couple of hot water bottles in the sleeping bags so my wife was more comfortable. I think all of us with gas lanterns also have other means of light. Keeping them charged or filed is always a concern. The Lucy lights are great. I love when they are all off too.
 

GrumpyRam

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im curios to know what the LED guys use as a cooking source. My Coleman lantern and stove go hand in hand when camping as they both run on the same fuel. a one gallon can can last me well through a camping season. I’ve seen rig setups with 20 lbs propane tanks mounted on tire racks. I would think these would take up way more space and weight.

 
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Ngneer

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I get the nostalgia feeling as well. However, they are unwieldy and take a lot of space compared to modern solutions. One thing though, I bet those Coleman lanterns will outlast today's offerings. I keep one in storage for emergencies, but I do not take it on trips anymore. Headlamps or this new setup work better for us.
Fragile as well but o so sweeet
 

MegaBug

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I still carry my old Coleman lantern, and a container of naptha and a boat-load of replacement mantles. Yea, the old lanterns don't hold up well to overlanding but they do sure seem right at the campsite. Somehow the loud hiss is good company. And yes, I do also have LED headlamps and porch lights on the trailer when I just want to flick a switch :-)