Rig getting heavy | OVERLAND BOUND COMMUNITY

Rig getting heavy

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Fig33

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So now that I have a bedrack, RTT and the gear that I take with me for camping, my truck is starting to sag on the rear…. I still have lots to learn so don’t know what will be the best way to fix this issue? Should I get stronger/extra leaf springs? I have also heard of a bigger or stronger shock for the rear and or adding a block.. So dear OB members, what advice can you give me?
 
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ThundahBeagle

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The shocks do not raise the truck. The shock is responsible for pushing the tire back down onto the road after hitting a bump sends the wheel upward.

In some cases, the coilover spring (front) can be made to sit higher on the shock tower. Or, one could have air bags installed in the rear. So it may sometimes seem like the shock is responsible for ride height, but that is technically untrue.

A stronger or taller rear spring may help for when the truck is loaded, but ride quality will suffer when the vehicle is empty - if it ever is empty.

A set of helper springs will allow your normal springs to work as normal when the truck is empty, and only after x amount of weight is applied to the truck, it will only sink a little before reaching the helper springs, which will then keep the truck at a given height.

For me, I only leveled the front, so I also experience some sag when loaded. I thought about rear blocks while that lifts the rear an inch or two, it doesnt stop the leaf spring from being tired.

Decisions...
 
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Conner Hunt

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This would be the BEST option to do. Full leaf spring replacement pack that’d be specifically accommodated to your weight.

That, and also I’d recommend getting your shocks revalved (if you’re running aftermarket shocks) to also handle the extra weight properly. Depending on the trails you hit though, that could be complete overkill and you’d be fine with just an add-a-leaf package, the above is just the best option you’d be able to do.
 
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DRAX

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Yup, 3rd for aftermarket progressive spring pack and better shocks. I have the Deaver Expedition leafs and Peak 2.0 rear shocks under the back of my truck, huge difference when carrying a lot of weight. Almost feels like you're not carrying anything, rides and handles loaded as well as it does stock but empty, at least with my setup.
 

MOAK

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A fourth vote for progressive, or heavier springs. If you have a spring shop near you they can modify according to your need without breaking the bank account, by adding a leaf. After 30 plus years in the transportation industry I did learn that air bag suspensions and airbag helpers do a couple of things I don’t like- When loaded, they will softly sway while cornering, and when they fail, and they do fail occasionally, you're screwed. I’m a big fan of the KISS principles, so just add a leaf. If, on the other hand, your truck is coil sprung, there are more than a couple of companies that offer different spring rates according to your specific needs.
 

Fig33

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Thanks all for your advice. I think I’m leaning towards a stronger spring. My rig is my daily driver so I’m planning or taking down most of the equipment and things off the rack while not going on trip. I don’t want to end up with 4-5 inches higher on the back so I’m thinking a heavier spring won’t lift the truck, while still adding extra strength to hold it up when I do put on that extra weight.
 

MMc

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Thanks all for your advice. I think I’m leaning towards a stronger spring. My rig is my daily driver so I’m planning or taking down most of the equipment and things off the rack while not going on trip. I don’t want to end up with 4-5 inches higher on the back so I’m thinking a heavier spring won’t lift the truck, while still adding extra strength to hold it up when I do put on that extra weight.
My progressive spring added 1.5 inches, It made all the difference in a empty ride.
 
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Downs

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First thing I would do is put the truck on the weigh scales "loaded for bear" and make sure you're not over your GVWR. Then go from there. With some weight info it'll be easier to select or have springs made that will work for your setup.

Shocks as someone else mentioned don't do anything to help with load capacity. They are simply there to dampen wheel movement (not push the wheel back down). Without a shock everytime you hit a bump the vehicle would ride like it was on a pogo stick. There are shocks that have helper springs on them or some that you can add air to, to help with the load but keep in mind that shock mounts ARE NOT meant to carry a load like that and will shear off if you try to use them as a load bearing part.
 

Mustang03

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Here's another option for beefing up your springs: SuperSprings International | Journey Better We added some pretty heavy-duty ones to our 1-ton Ram and it sets dead level now. The drawback is that if we dismount the slide-in camper, it rides pretty rough on the stock shocks. We solved that by putting on Rancho RS9000, which allow us to 'tune' the shocks to the load. Problem solved. Oh.. with some basic tools we did the install ourselves in our garage at home.