Poll: I approach trip planning by...

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I approach trip planning by...

  • What is this "planning" thing that you mention?

    Votes: 7 24.1%
  • I reach out to others for their planning data (GPX, camp spots, etc.) and rely solely on that.

    Votes: 1 3.4%
  • I reach out for planning data (GPX, camp spots, etc.) and use that as a basis for my own planning.

    Votes: 15 51.7%
  • I pore over maps in order to blaze my own trail.

    Votes: 22 75.9%
  • Planning schmanning

    Votes: 2 6.9%

  • Total voters
    29

MOAK

Rank V
Member

Member II

2,835
Wernersville, PA, USA
First Name
Donald
Last Name
Diehl
Member #

0745

Paper maps. Then again, planning? We plan only for reservation back country sites, Canyonlands, Big Bend, etc. after that we drive by the seat of our pants, instinct usually gets us on really good secluded dirt roads and really good secluded campsites along the way.
 
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ZombieCat

Rank V
Member
Adventure

Advocate I

1,421
Maryland
First Name
Adventure
Last Name
Awaits!
Member #

8736

As many have stated, it depends on the trip - where, how long, what vehicle(s) I’m taking and what I plan to do.
First I decide what the trip is about - exploring, culture, hiking, backpacking, photography, visiting friends or some combination thereof. That leads to the location(s), length, timing and how “planned “ it will be. I’m usually solo, but sometimes meet friends along the way, which means collaborating with those folks. Also, is the place super popular? How hard will it be to find free camping? Should I reserve? Do I want a base camp or to move frequently? Do I need event tickets or access permits?
A good example is visiting Glacier National Park and the surrounding area. I’ll be there for 2 weeks this summer as part of a much longer trip. I want to do a little of everything in Glacier. A friend will fly out and join me for one week. I decided to base camp inside the park, specifically along the GTTS Road, as it negates the need for a vehicle entry pass. We’ll have access to the free shuttle and won’t need to constantly fight for parking. Although she will be in a ground tent, having my hard-sided camper means we won’t get relocated if bears become an issue (yes, this happened to me and the NPS put me on the far side of the park, two hours away. Yikes!). Because we planned, we will: Visit the Canadian side (Waterton Lakes); already have tickets for a boat trip that dovetails into our Grinnell Glacier hike; and will get to experience some very cool Native American culture at the powwow in Browning. We also know all our potential hikes, the Native America Speaks schedule, dining options (Two Sisters huck pie!) and a few other places we’d like to visit if time allows. We can always adjust if an opportunity arises, but having both a plan and knowledge of the options will make the best use of our time. More fun, less stress.
Research and PLANNING for the win on this trip.
If you guessed that I’m a super nerd, you would be correct. Itinerary, expense spreadsheets, packing list, downloaded maps, everything PDF’d and saved in files on my phone (w/hard copy backup) for this type of 8000+ mile excursion.
In contrast, my September trip has only a few planned items and I’ll be winging it for the remainder of the month. Still did my research, just no hard plans. Gonna ramble and explore…
 
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Kevin108

Rank V
Member

Member III

2,741
Virginia Beach, VA
Member #

6632

I'll mark something in Gaia that I find mentioned, then use that as a sort of beacon to focus my exploration. Sometimes it's a trail or camp site I've found mentioned elsewhere, other times it's just a seasonal gate I've found marked in a map layer.
 
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OcoeeG

Rank II

Enthusiast III

443
SE TN
First Name
Chris
Last Name
Gee
As many have stated, it depends on the trip - where, how long, what vehicle(s) I’m taking and what I plan to do.
First I decide what the trip is about - exploring, culture, hiking, backpacking, photography, visiting friends or some combination thereof. That leads to the location(s), length, timing and how “planned “ it will be. I’m usually solo, but sometimes meet friends along the way, which means collaborating with those folks. Also, is the place super popular? How hard will it be to find free camping? Should I reserve? Do I want a base camp or to move frequently? Do I need event tickets or access permits?
A good example is visiting Glacier National Park and the surrounding area. I’ll be there for 2 weeks this summer as part of a much longer trip. I want to do a little of everything in Glacier. A friend will fly out and join me for one week. I decided to base camp inside the park, specifically along the GTTS Road, as it negates the need for a vehicle entry pass. We’ll have access to the free shuttle and won’t need to constantly fight for parking. Although she will be in a ground tent, having my hard-sided camper means we won’t get relocated if bears become an issue (yes, this happened to me and the NPS put me on the far side of the park, two hours away. Yikes!). Because we planned, we will: Visit the Canadian side (Waterton Lakes); already have tickets for a boat trip that dovetails into our Grinnell Glacier hike; and will get to experience some very cool Native American culture at the powwow in Browning. We also know all our potential hikes, the Native America Speaks schedule, dining options (Two Sisters huck pie!) and a few other places we’d like to visit if time allows. We can always adjust if an opportunity arises, but having both a plan and knowledge of the options will make the best use of our time. More fun, less stress.
Research and PLANNING for the win on this trip.
If you guessed that I’m a super nerd, you would be correct. Itinerary, expense spreadsheets, packing list, downloaded maps, everything PDF’d and saved in files on my phone (w/hard copy backup) for this type of 8000+ mile excursion.
In contrast, my September trip has only a few planned items and I’ll be winging it for the remainder of the month. Still did my research, just no hard plans. Gonna ramble and explore…
What time you going to Glacier? We were there in Late June last year and GTSR wasn't open yet. :( if going early prepare for that.
 
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ZombieCat

Rank V
Member
Adventure

Advocate I

1,421
Maryland
First Name
Adventure
Last Name
Awaits!
Member #

8736

Mid-July, so no issues with the GTTSR, although maybe a few cool nights and random snowflakes. We’ll be bringing microspikes for higher elevation hiking. As we visited the western and central areas of the park in 2020, we plan to concentrate on the eastern region this trip. This will be my 4th visit. Can’t wait to see the views and critters!
 

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