What does everyone use for water storage?

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Snowwalker

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Four 22 liter(5 gallon) green plastic Jerry cans. A water filter and away I go. This is only for drinking water, washing and dishes can be done with boiled water from just about any creek. river or pond where I travel. Why 88 liters( 20 gallons) when there is water just about everywhere? Well most of that water is in ponds created by a large rodent. If you have experienced or seen someone with Giardiasis( Beaver Fever) , so true running water is harder to find.
 

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Four 22 liter(5 gallon) green plastic Jerry cans. A water filter and away I go. This is only for drinking water, washing and dishes can be done with boiled water from just about any creek. river or pond where I travel. Why 88 liters( 20 gallons) when there is water just about everywhere? Well most of that water is in ponds created by a large rodent. If you have experienced or seen someone with Giardiasis( Beaver Fever) , so true running water is harder to find.
Same boat traveling around beaver ponds and swamps, but usually I try to setup near a swimmable lake if I'm crown land camping ( I got a few spots that the majority of people cant seem to reach ). I've done a lot of backpacking and hike in camp spots that made me rely on some questionable water sources and I still carry filters or boil water when needed but I try to carry enough to not have to do that lol. i tend to use up and run out of water at campgrounds and sometimes have shown up where they have boil water advisories that we didn't know about beforehand lol.
 

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I also rely on a jerry can solution. Advantages: easy cleaning, removable and therefore easy to fill (or easy disposal, if really bad water was filled), as well as individual manageable quantities. With a small canister, I can get water even in poorer countries if I ask for it. If I would try to fill a whole tank with hundreds of liters like some ExMos have them on board, that would not be ok in my opinion.

We have 3 to 4 jerry cans with us for fresh water, 10 liters or 2.5 gallons each. In addition, 20 liters or 5 gallons of water to wash hands, etc. and a water bag (black, heated by the sun) for shower water when needed.

The jerry cans are made of plastic and have their permanent place on board, where they are securely lashed. If jerry cans are used, they should of course be as light as possible and at the same time unbreakable. From a hygiene point of view, glass or stainless steel would be the optimum. Glass is of course not a solution from a saftey and sturdiness point of view. Plastic is comparatively porous and offers colonization surfaces for germs. With watertanks, stainless steel is not a problem, so the choice of canisters is limited in practice or cost-intensive. I therefore take plastic canisters and clean them thoroughly on a regular basis (keep an eye on possible recontamination!) My canisters have a large opening (wide-neck canisters), so that they can be cleaned better. In addition, you can of course use different filter systems (have such a small hand filter) or in regions where drinking water is really critical in terms of cleanliness or one is very sensitive there also buy water in large containers from the supermarket.
 

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My go-to is the LCI water can with an RV sink pump built into the cap. For longer trips I also fill the blue Scepter can and/or an additional LCI can with normal cap.
1641224199406.png
 
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genocache

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I also rely on a jerry can solution. Advantages: easy cleaning, removable and therefore easy to fill (or easy disposal, if really bad water was filled), as well as individual manageable quantities. With a small canister, I can get water even in poorer countries if I ask for it. If I would try to fill a whole tank with hundreds of liters like some ExMos have them on board, that would not be ok in my opinion.

We have 3 to 4 jerry cans with us for fresh water, 10 liters or 2.5 gallons each. In addition, 20 liters or 5 gallons of water to wash hands, etc. and a water bag (black, heated by the sun) for shower water when needed.

The jerry cans are made of plastic and have their permanent place on board, where they are securely lashed. If jerry cans are used, they should of course be as light as possible and at the same time unbreakable. From a hygiene point of view, glass or stainless steel would be the optimum. Glass is of course not a solution from a saftey and sturdiness point of view. Plastic is comparatively porous and offers colonization surfaces for germs. With watertanks, stainless steel is not a problem, so the choice of canisters is limited in practice or cost-intensive. I therefore take plastic canisters and clean them thoroughly on a regular basis (keep an eye on possible recontamination!) My canisters have a large opening (wide-neck canisters), so that they can be cleaned better. In addition, you can of course use different filter systems (have such a small hand filter) or in regions where drinking water is really critical in terms of cleanliness or one is very sensitive there also buy water in large containers from the supermarket.

Bjoem, I'd like to see your water mounting set up, have any pictures? I am trying to figure out how to lash everything down and still keep the Rovers utility.
 

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We have a 10 gallon igloo for summer trips. Just throw a 10-20 pound bag of ice in each day keeps us set for water. We’ve also got a 5 gallon igloo with built in legs and a 1 gallon pump sprayer for washing. For bigger trips we’ll also bring the 7 gallon reliance cube.
 
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El-Dracho

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Bjoem, I'd like to see your water mounting set up, have any pictures? I am trying to figure out how to lash everything down and still keep the Rovers utility.
Hi,

Yes, of course. Take a look here.

The freshwater cans live in a box easily accessible through the doors of the 2nd row. At that point I have built the interior exactly for that purpose.

20190216_142422.jpg


An additonal 20L can is properly fitted in a jerry can holder outside of the rig. Easily accessible.

20210902_162045.jpg

The 20L solar shower lives on the hood, strapped down to airline rails.

Highlift-El-Dracho.JPG

Inside I have installed a few tension belts, where I can lash an additional canister or water containers from the supermarket if necessary.

Bjoern
 
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Hey, so I usually use a 5 gallon Reliance AquaPak for storing water but I hate lugging the thing around campgrounds to refill it and it usually only gets me about 2 -3 days off grid. So I am interested in seeing what everyone else uses for vehicle or trailer/camper ( I know most campers will have a mounted tank somewhere but maybe some of the teardrop guys can chime in).
here is a picture of my rigs. they aren't glamorous or expensive and no cool gear but they work for what I need them for lol.
View attachment 219121 View attachment 219122View attachment 219123
Have you considered adding a water tank to the trailer? PCV pipe style around the perimeter or a thin ish flat tank mounted to the floor or under it? I'd let the trailer carry the weight if possible.
 
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Have you considered adding a water tank to the trailer? PCV pipe style around the perimeter or a thin ish flat tank mounted to the floor or under it? I'd let the trailer carry the weight if possible.
I have thought of that. They seem to be fairly pricey. I am going to be building a new trailer in the future ( hopefully fairly soon) and it's kinda why I started this thread to see if people preferred a solid mounted tank or a portable one. I was thinking I may get a larger portable tank ( or multiple) and then run a pump from one if I feel the need. Also my currant Aquapac leaks at the nozzle as they all do after a fee uses and it drives me up the wall lol.
 
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Mike W

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I used to use the front runner can with the brass tap and it works fine, but recently I have just been using a couple scepters with the submersible pump and faucet that Michael did in a video awhile back. He has since abandoned that because he got a fancy lifesaver filter can thing. (i still need a water filter setup).

1641252624772.png
 

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Bjoem, thank you, Aahhh the advantage of the 5 door! I have a 3 door and would like to put a SS tank in my wheelwell right where yours are. Great idea on the solar shower, I'm going to start carrying mine in the spare on the hood.
 

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I have a Front Runner footwell water tank in thecopcar. It holds 10.8 gallons.
On second read and thinking about it for my own application, this could fit in the rear seat footwell of my 4runner the size specs on are front runners web site so will need to check it out with the seats folded down, as of now this is really just wasted space - or better said where things go to hide…
 

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On second read and thinking about it for my own application, this could fit in the rear seat footwell of my 4runner the size specs on are front runners web site so will need to check it out with the seats folded down, as of now this is really just wasted space - or better said where things go to hide…
They don't say it, but I really think it was designed for a 4Runner. There is a driveshaft tunnel notch in the tanks, but I had to build a slight platform for it to clear the wide driveshaft tunnel in my rig.
 

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For camping using the '97 4Runner (a smallish vehicle) the Scepter 10L MWCs are my preference. I like their size and weight when filled. Also, if the vehicle crashes into a ditch or rolls over in a remote, waterless area, the Scepters will likely survive. The thin-walled consumer cans seem more fragile.
 
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