Warm gloves for fine motor tasks

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nuclear_runner

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I like camping in the winter. There cold keeps crowds to a minimum, and I think the forest is really magical during stick season. However, in the morning I really struggle to keep my fingers warm, esp when shutting my RTT, making coffee, and other tasks that involve touching metal. I've even gotten frostnip a few times. Big bulky gloves are warm, but limit your ability to do fine motor tasks. Thin gloves are decent at trapping heat, but unless you're hiking hard or running, I find that there isn't enough heat to really make that very effective. So I'm looking for a glove that is both very warm and allows for fine motor skills. To complicate matters, I have dyspraxia which means I struggle with fine motor tasks (among many other things). Let me know what works for you!
 

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You'd probably do best with mitten gloves where the finger or fingers are removable.
I don't know about for overlanding or camping but I have a couple of pairs of glacier gloves for coldweather fishing that the fingers flip back they have kept my hands warm while wet in 30 ish degrees on the lake with them wet.
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Let us know if you find something. My daughter has Raynauds and we tried for years to find this very thing. Never did find a good solution. There just isn’t a flexible effective insulator that isn’t thick. Perhaps one of the newer electrical options?
 
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I just use blue silicone gloves. Disposable doctors gloves etc.
 
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genocache

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If you take a medium plastic pill bottle and fill it with hot water you can stick it in your pocket for warmth. Just hold it every so often. Hot water not boiling. At home I keep a couple full and microwave them for 30-50 seconds, then go outside and work on the car or........
 
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MiamiC70

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I like camping in the winter. There cold keeps crowds to a minimum, and I think the forest is really magical during stick season. However, in the morning I really struggle to keep my fingers warm, esp when shutting my RTT, making coffee, and other tasks that involve touching metal. I've even gotten frostnip a few times. Big bulky gloves are warm, but limit your ability to do fine motor tasks. Thin gloves are decent at trapping heat, but unless you're hiking hard or running, I find that there isn't enough heat to really make that very effective. So I'm looking for a glove that is both very warm and allows for fine motor skills. To complicate matters, I have dyspraxia which means I struggle with fine motor tasks (among many other things). Let me know what works for you!
 

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I would take a look at Hestra gloves, they have several models that could work so I'm not recommend any specific model. They might be pricey but they will last. You might want to contact them and ask what they recommend.

I picked the US website for you.

 
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D4R4x4

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I really like insulated mechanics gloves for tasks that require some dexterity in the cold.
I concur. If reg mechanix gloves aren't warm enough, I have a pair that are insulated that have kept my hands warm.
I also have had a few pairs of cutless gloves. They typically have wool type material, a fiberglass or kevlar and then coated in a grippy rubber. They seem to be pretty warm as well. And you still have pretty good movement and feel.
 

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Sorry for the... months long silence, it's been a winter of trying things. I haven't found a solution I love, but I have found some things that I can live with. I think I'm more sensitive to the cold. Reading tons of reviews and such, it seems like there is def no perfect solution for those of use who are cold sensitive. Layering is good, but inconvenient if you're switching back and forth (cooking). A fleece lined base layer and a ski glove overtop (that you remove) will do the trick. Additionally if you crack a few handwarmer's and leave them in your pockets, you can warm your fingers up after touching cold things.

BUT, if you want the nuclear option, I'd recommend going with some kind of hybrid glove that has fleece fingers under a pull back mitton. Something like the Sitka Incinerator Flip Mitt. These seem very popular for people hunting in cold areas. You can tuck a handwarmer into the mitten (some even have a spot for it) but be aware they do use oxygen to make heat, so they might cool down if you're not opening the mitten a lot. Be warned these can be VERY expensive. Also, there are electric gloves out there if you are truly desperate. Godspeed, and may you have warm fingers next winter!
 
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M Rose

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I have severe reaction to cold in my hands. I have had frostbite too many times to count and now my hands hurt when the temps drop below 39 degrees. Over the years I too suffered from the glove conundrum. This year I wanted/needed to commute to work by bicycle. Looking over all the options of cycling specific gloves I found a solution that finally works for me. I got a pair of thin cycling full finger gloves with leather palms and finger tips and use that for a base layer, then I got a pair of electric “Crab Claw” glove/mitten where the mitten folds back to reveal the crab claw. This gives access to the thumb, index, and middle finger while keeping the ring and pinky fingers together. The electric gloves run on a usb rechargeable battery pack… although I only needed the heater element 2 times when the temps were dropping way below 0.


 

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I’m in the “no perfect glove” camp. Would highly recommend a smartwool glove liner paired with either hand warmers in pockets and/or a larger insulated glove.

I always have the liner on and then if the temps are 0-35(F) I use an insulated Carhartt leather work glove.

If the weather is calling for negatives - 5-10(F) then I use the Smartwool liner in a set of OR mitten liners and forearm length mittens.

And also keep the hand warmers in the pockets. For what they cost they’re a lifesaver when trying to complete a task. You can get your hands ready, glove-no glove in your pocket, hold those hand warmers and then pull your hands out, complete your task and get them back in for warmth. If you need to do this multiple times it works great. I do this a lot when unloading my roof rack equipment.

Best of luck and stay warm!
 
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I’m in the “no perfect glove” camp. Would highly recommend a smartwool glove liner paired with either hand warmers in pockets and/or a larger insulated glove.

I always have the liner on and then if the temps are 0-35(F) I use an insulated Carhartt leather work glove.

If the weather is calling for negatives - 5-10(F) then I use the Smartwool liner in a set of OR mitten liners and forearm length mittens.

And also keep the hand warmers in the pockets. For what they cost they’re a lifesaver when trying to complete a task. You can get your hands ready, glove-no glove in your pocket, hold those hand warmers and then pull your hands out, complete your task and get them back in for warmth. If you need to do this multiple times it works great. I do this a lot when unloading my roof rack equipment.

Best of luck and stay warm!
I think one of my biggest mistakes was using liners made for running. Since they're designed for exercise, they really need some level of exertion or they just don't work.
 

KAIONE

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I’m in the “no perfect glove” camp. Would highly recommend a smartwool glove liner paired with either hand warmers in pockets and/or a larger insulated glove.

I always have the liner on and then if the temps are 0-35(F) I use an insulated Carhartt leather work glove.

If the weather is calling for negatives - 5-10(F) then I use the Smartwool liner in a set of OR mitten liners and forearm length mittens.

And also keep the hand warmers in the pockets. For what they cost they’re a lifesaver when trying to complete a task. You can get your hands ready, glove-no glove in your pocket, hold those hand warmers and then pull your hands out, complete your task and get them back in for warmth. If you need to do this multiple times it works great. I do this a lot when unloading my roof rack equipment.

Best of luck and stay warm!
I think one of my biggest mistakes was using liners made for running. Since they're designed for exercise, they really need some level of exertion or they just don't work.
You’re right. It took me awhile to go through some North Face liners and others before I found the smart wool. It’s a delicate balance between warmth and dexterity.
 

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You'd probably do best with mitten gloves where the finger or fingers are removable.
I don't know about for overlanding or camping but I have a couple of pairs of glacier gloves for coldweather fishing that the fingers flip back they have kept my hands warm while wet in 30 ish degrees on the lake with them wet.
View attachment 217739View attachment 217740
I like those. I need to look into them.